The 5 Frequently Asked Questions About Graston Technique


chiropractorNow and then, you’ll hear about some newfangled treatment for pain. Naturally, this bodes well for you if you happen to be suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) because of your job or shoulder pain from playing a rough football game. Any opportunity that allows you to get relief from the physical suffering is certainly good news. And that opportunity could possibly come from Graston.

 

If you’re unfamiliar with Graston, you may be wondering about several things: what is it exactly or how is it done. So here are just five of the most frequently asked questions about this innovative treatment.

 

1. What is Graston?

Graston Technique is an instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization treatment. It’s widely known to be very effective in detecting and treating scar tissue. Scar tissue, incidentally, causes pain and limits range of motion, both of which could prevent you from going about your normal activities.

 

2. How does Graston work?

This innovative technique, which is based on the works of an orthopedic surgeon named Dr. James Cyriax, makes use of six core tools. These tools are made from stainless steel in concave and convex shapes. But don’t worry about the stainless steel part because the tools aren’t sharp but rather have round edges.

 

The technique uses cross-friction massage and re-introduces small degrees of trauma to the affected area. This increases blood flow, which begins and supports the healing process.

 

3. Will the treatment be painful?

The practitioner will use the Graston tools to run over and “catch” on fibrotic tissue, identifying the area of restriction. The tool is then used to break up the scar tissue so that the body can absorb it. Now some patients have reported some form of minor discomfort during this treatment and some bruising may also occur after the procedure.

 

4. How often would the treatment be done?

The Graston treatment is generally given for a period of four to five weeks. Patients get two treatments every week. But according to the Graston site, patients usually experience results by the third or fourth treatment.

 

5. What conditions can Graston treat?

Graston can treat acute and chronic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), Achilles tendonitis, cervical strain, fibromyalgia, illiotibial band syndrome, knee pain, plantar fasciitis or foot pain, shin splints, trigger points, tennis and golfer’s elbow, and post fracture pain.

 

Graston reduces overall time of treatment. It cuts down on having to take anti-inflammatory medication. It’s known to resolve chronic conditions that once were thought to be permanent. And it supports speedier recovery or rehabilitation. For more information about this innovative treatment, ask your specialist today.

 

Now and then, you’ll hear about some newfangled treatment for pain. Naturally, this bodes well for you if you happen to be suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) because of your job or shoulder pain from playing a rough football game. Any opportunity that allows you to get relief from the physical suffering is certainly good news. And that opportunity could possibly come from Graston.

 

If you’re unfamiliar with Graston, you may be wondering about several things: what is it exactly or how is it done. So here are just five of the most frequently asked questions about this innovative treatment.

 

1. What is Graston?

Graston Technique is an instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization treatment. It’s widely known to be very effective in detecting and treating scar tissue. Scar tissue, incidentally, causes pain and limits range of motion, both of which could prevent you from going about your normal activities.

 

2. How does Graston work?

This innovative technique, which is based on the works of an orthopedic surgeon named Dr. James Cyriax, makes use of six core tools. These tools are made from stainless steel in concave and convex shapes. But don’t worry about the stainless steel part because the tools aren’t sharp but rather have round edges.

 

The technique uses cross-friction massage and re-introduces small degrees of trauma to the affected area. This increases blood flow, which begins and supports the healing process.

 

3. Will the treatment be painful?

The practitioner will use the Graston tools to run over and “catch” on fibrotic tissue, identifying the area of restriction. The tool is then used to break up the scar tissue so that the body can absorb it. Now some patients have reported some form of minor discomfort during this treatment and some bruising may also occur after the procedure.

 

4. How often would the treatment be done?

The Graston treatment is generally given for a period of four to five weeks. Patients get two treatments every week. But according to the Graston site, patients usually experience results by the third or fourth treatment.

 

5. What conditions can Graston treat?

Graston can treat acute and chronic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), Achilles tendonitis, cervical strain, fibromyalgia, illiotibial band syndrome, knee pain, plantar fasciitis or foot pain, shin splints, trigger points, tennis and golfer’s elbow, and post fracture pain.

 

Graston reduces overall time of treatment. It cuts down on having to take anti-inflammatory medication. It’s known to resolve chronic conditions that once were thought to be permanent. And it supports speedier recovery or rehabilitation. For more information about this innovative treatment, ask your specialist today.

 

 








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